The Marriage Plot

The Marriage Plot: A Novel

“So why are you taking Zipperstein’s class?” she asked.
“Philosophical interest,” Leonard said. “Literally. Philosophy’s all about theory of language right now. It’s all linguistics. So I figured I’d check it out.”
“Aren’t you a biology major, too?”
“That’s what I really am,” Leonard said. “The philosophy’s just a side line.”
Madeleine realized that she’d never dated a science major. “Do you want to be a doctor?”
“Right now all I want to do is get the waitress’s attention.”
Leonard waves his arm a few times to no avail. Suddenly he said, “Is it hot in here?” Without waiting for an answer, he reached into the back pocket of his jeans and pulled out a blue bandanna, which he proceeded to put over his head, tying it in back and making a number of small, precise adjustments until he was satisfied.

Flirting, romancing, romanticizing, and sex, around Derrida, Heidegger, Nietzsche, Tolstoy, Paris, 18-19th century literary giants, Mother Teresa, Christian mysticism, backpacking, lithium, yeast experiments, and writing thesis on an old Royal typewriter.
Eugenides essentially do what he always does best: telling from multiple point of views about a single story and let his readers fall in love (or down to hate) with its characters through other character’s perspective. Reading people are much like reading books, and you might need to read a lot of books to understand just one person. “Let’s not try to understand each other by autobiography,” said a character in this story.

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2012 Oscar Foreign Language Film Submissions: ‘The Turin Horse’

2011 Berlin International Film Festival – Winners FIPRESCI Prize, Silver Berlin Bear.

146 minutes, black and white, minimal characters plus a horse, a one-room old barnhouse and its surroundings, minimal dialogues, very minimal circular plot, so very Beckett-ish and almost successfuly Tarkovskian in all its conscious efforts.

My Rating: 8/10

>>>Check out my other reviews on 2012 Oscar Foreign Language Film Submissions:
Bullhead – Belgium
The Colors of the Mountain – Colombia
Pina – Germany
Attenberg
– Greece
Happy, Happy – Norway
The Front Line
– South Korea

Also my review on 2011 Oscar Foreign Language Film finalists here.

2012 Oscar Foreign Language Film Submissions: ‘The Front Line’

2011 Daejong Film Awards – Winners Best Film, Best Cinematography, Best Lighting, Best Production.

First a bit Hamburger Hill, then a small portion Full Metal Jacket. Next, tints from Saving Private Ryan, and after that a pint of Letters from Iwo Jima. There are many good original things in this film, but somehow overshadowed by the ‘look-alike’ elements.

My Rating: 5/10

>>>Check out my other reviews on 2012 Oscar Foreign Language Film Submissions:
Bullhead – Belgium
The Colors of the Mountain – Colombia
Pina – Germany
Attenberg
– Greece
Happy, Happy – Norway

Also my review on 2011 Oscar Foreign Language Film finalists here.

Habemus Papam

2011 Golden Globes, Italy – Winner Best Film.
2011 Italian National Syndicate of Film Journalists Award – Winners European Silver Ribbon, Best Director, Best Cinematography, Best Costume Design, Best Original Story, Best Producer, Best Production Design.

How difficult could it be to elect a pope? Choosing one, single, man? And how difficult it is to be chosen as one? Forget all what you’ve read and saw on Angels & Demons, there’s no Ewan McGregor in sight. It turns out harder than most of us think it would. Also a lot, much lot, dilemmatic, complicated, mischievous, and by the name of God, heartbreaking too.

My Rating: 8/10

Coldplay: ‘Mylo Xyloto’

Release date: October 25

Tracklist:
01. Mylo Xyloto
02. Hurts Like Heaven
03. Paradise
04. Charlie Brown
05. Us Against The World
06. M.M.I.X.
07. Every Teardrop Is A Waterfall
08. Major Minus
09. U.F.O.
10. Princess Of China
11. Up In Flames
12. A Hopeful Transmission
13. Don’t Let It Break Your Heart
14. Up With The Birds

My favorite tune: Don’t Let It Break Your Heart

Their most ambitious? Doubtful. Might be their last? Now that’s something Chris and friends should really consider before their band wanders-off into creativity drain, somehow, someday, eventually, considering these ‘on the threshold’ song materials. It still sounds good for now, but if they dare to repeat something like this one or two albums more, those will be one or two tiresome albums too many.

My Rating: 7/10

Damned

Damned

Among the early Catholics, he says, the Church found that monotheism couldn’t replace the long-beloved polytheism now outdated and considered pagan. Celebrants were too used to petitioning individual deities, so the Church created the various saints, each a counterpart to an earlier deity, representing love, success, recovery from illness, etc. As battles raged and kingdoms rose and fell the god Aryaman was replaced by Sraosha. Mithra supplanted Vishnu. Zoroaster made Mithra obsolete, and with each succeeding god, the prior ruling deity was cast into obscurity and contempt.
“Even the word demon,” Leonard says, “originates with Christian theologians who misinterpreted ‘daimon’ in the writings of Socrates. Originally the word meant ‘muse’ or ‘inspiration,’ but its most common definition was ‘god.'” He adds that if civilization lasts long enough into the future, one day even Jesus will be skulking around Hades, banished and ticked off.

It’s too hard to wade out that smirk in our face when everything (or, at least almost everything) we think as utterly ridiculous about the afterlife are turned out to be true in this story.
Nothing important here. Palahniuk stopped taking being important so seriously around three novels ago, when he shifted focus into launching one book per year instead of crafting something that you can recognize as profound, like his earlier works. This is another long non-stop orgy of sarcastic craziness, just like Snuff, Pygmy, and Tell-All, all basically about those same themes: Insane all-American rich parents and their equally lunatic kids, absurd adoption scheme, bizarre sex acts, and series of not so surprising anymore plot twists. We don’t know about literary values, but narrative qualities can go to hell for sure as long as the sole aim is book sales figure.

2012 Oscar Foreign Language Film Submissions: ‘Pina’

2011 German Film Awards – Winner Best Documentary.

Use your whole body to speak and tell story. Uh huh. Modern dancers feel and think like the rest of us, but they express their feelings and creativity in some Über-bizzare and exhaustive way, unlike most of us. Modern dancers are athletic creatures from another planet. Where do they come from? One of them, for example, is Ditta Miranda Jasjfi from Indonesia; a planet not too far away.

My Rating: 7/10

>>>Check out my other reviews on 2012 Oscar Foreign Language Film Submissions:
Bullhead – Belgium
The Colors of the Mountain – Colombia
Attenberg – Greece
Happy, Happy – Norway

Also my review on 2011 Oscar Foreign Language Film finalists here.